Posts Tagged john rylands library

John Rylands Library “The Reformation” exhibition!

Henry V111 © 2017 by Simon Peter Sutherland

Henry V111 © 2017 by Simon Peter Sutherland

October 31st 20017 marks the 500th anniversary of the Reformation. Christians and people from all around the world are making ready to celebrate and remember this major turning point in the history of the Church.

In my opinion, John Rylands Library, Manchester has the greatest Biblical archive in Britain and holds some of the finest examples of 16th century printed Bibles anywhere in the world. As a contribution to this momentous and unique anniversary, Rylands library, Deansgate is holding an autumn Reformation exhibition starting on 7th September 2017 through to 4th March 2018.

According to the John Rylands website, the Reformation exhibition will focus upon central persons of the Reformation, Martin Luther, Henry V111 and William Tyndale and “will explore the early years of the upheaval and the roles of these three men, considering the war in print which had a lasting effect on the history of Europe through propaganda, words and ideas.

Today, an awakening is happening, people all over are talking about reformation. Yet there are a number of false new reformations taking place, and the Church of England is jumping back into bed again with Rome, but there is also a true Reformation. Thus, I look unto Christ, in anticipation and expectation of what God is going to do and is doing in the future history of His people.

The exhibition is free and I will certainly be attending and no doubt re-attending.

It is upon us. It is ongoing. Now is the time!

Advertisements

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

The words of the oldest New Testament fragment

Simon Peter Sutherland at Ephesus  © 2004/2013 Simon Peter Sutherland

Simon Peter Sutherland at Ephesus
© 2004/2013 Simon Peter Sutherland

In John Rylands Library, Manchester UK, we have the oldest fragment of the New Testament to date. During an age of critical modern scholarship and its heavy critique of Biblical texts, we have a great testimony in direct contrast to many critical claims of modern textual scholars.

Many claim that the New Testament accounts were written much later than they actually were, and when I see this fragment as I do on a regular basis, its surviving words never cease to amaze me. They are a pure testimony to the reality of the absolute identity of Jesus Christ, son of God, who was and is, and is to come, “The Truth”. Not ‘A’ truth, but ‘The’ Truth.

The Greek fragment, of John 18: 31-33, on the recto reads as follows;

the Jews, “For us it is not permitted to kill
anyone,” so that the word of Jesus might be fulfilled, which he
spoke signifying what kind of death he was going to
to die. Entered therefore again into the Praeto-
rium Pilate and summoned Jesus
and he said to him, “Thou art king of the
Jews?”
The Greek fragment of John 18: 37-38, on the verso reads as follows,
“a King I am. For this I have been born
and (for this) I have come into the world so that I would
testify to the truth. Everyone who is of the truth
hears of me my voice.” Said to him
Pilate, “What is truth?” and this
having said, again he went out unto the Jews
and said to them, “I find not one
fault in him
.”

Is it not amazing that the oldest fragment in the world of the New Testament, dated possibly earlier than 100 AD and no later than 150 AD, speaks of such a great testimony to the word of God? Jesus said, “Heaven and earth shall pass away, but my words shall not pass away.” Matthew 24: 35.

This is certainly true.

, , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

The gospel of Mary, Papyrus 463 at John Rylands Library

One of only two Greek fragments of the hugely controversial and so-called ‘Gospel of Mary’ is now on display at Rylands Library, Manchester.

 

The manuscript itself dates back to the 3rd century AD and is Gnostic in its content and the content is believed by some to have been written by Mary of Magdela. But this is highly improbable since the book itself was most likely composed during the late 2nd century AD, however the manuscript is on display with ancient Mummy portraits and Papyri which is part of an exhibition that is said to be both rare and “ground-breaking”.

 

The Faces and Voices exhibition is at John Rylands Library, Deansgate, Manchester and is on now until  25 November 2012, so I will no doubt be posting thoughts about the exhibition and the contents during that period.

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment

The truth of the oldest New Testament fragment

n John Rylands Library, Manchester UK, we have the oldest fragment of the New Testament to date. During an age of critical modern scholarship and its heavy critique of Biblical texts, we have a great testimony in direct contrast to many critical claims of modern textual scholars.

Many claim that the New Testament accounts were written much later than they actually were, and when I see this fragment as I do on a regular basis, its surviving words never cease to amaze me. They are a pure testimony to the reality of the absolute identity of Jesus Christ, son of God, who was and is, and is to come, “The Truth”. Not ‘A’ truth, but ‘The’ Truth.

The Greek fragment, of John 18: 31-33, on the recto reads as follows, ,

“the Jews, “For us it is not permitted to kill
anyone,” so that the word of Jesus might be fulfilled, which he
spoke signifying what kind of death he was going to
to die. Entered therefore again into the Praeto-
rium Pilate and summoned Jesus
and he said to him, “Thou art king of the
Jews?”

The Greek fragment of John 18: 37-38, on the verso reads as follows,

“a King I am. For this I have been born
and (for this) I have come into the world so that I would
testify to the truth. Everyone who is of the truth
hears of me my voice.” Said to him
Pilate, “What is truth?” and this
having said, again he went out unto the Jews
and said to them, “I find not one
fault in him.”

Is it not amazing that the oldest fragment in the world of the New Testament, dated possibly earlier than 100 AD and no later than 150 AD, speaks of such a great testimony to the word of God? Jesus said, “Heaven and earth shall pass away, but my words shall not pass away.” Matthew 24: 35.

This is certainly true. Glory to the Lamb of God.

Simon Peter Sutherland

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment