Posts Tagged “Tyndale New Testament”

William Tyndale: The man who kick started the English Reformation

William Tyndale © 2017 Simon Peter SutherlandIn 1523, a man named William Tyndale visited the city of London to gain permission to translate the Greek New Testament into English. He visited a Bishop by the name of Cuthbert Tunstall and requested help, but Tyndale was rejected.

It wouldn’t be long before Tyndale self exiled out of England and headed for Europe and onto Germany.  Tyndale was a Lutheran, and there he likely met with Reformer Martin Luther who had recently published his own translation of the New Testament into German.

It was at Wittenberg, Germany where Tyndale probably began to expertly translate the New Testament, from Greek into English. By 1525 Tyndale had published his translation using the printing press at Cologne.

He did not have a licence, and his burden lay for his own people and so he was forced to smuggle the New Testament back into England by ship, along the River Thames.

By 1529 Tyndale had been publicly declared a heretic and his books publically burned outside St.Paul’s Cathedral. By 1535 a Judas by the name of Henry Phillips had befriended and betrayed Tyndale and he was captured, imprisioned, condemned, strangled and burned at the stake in 1536.

But it was not the end of Tyndale. That same year his translated work was lifted and used in the very first complete English Bible by Miles Coverdale. Likewise, the translation work was later incorporated into the Geneva Bible and eventually the King James Bible.

Some say as much as 84-90% of the King James New Testament, was the work of William Tyndale.

Most historians today say the English Reformation began with Henry V111’s quest for a male heir, but that is not quite true. The 16th century English Reformation began when Tyndale spread out the Scriptures openly before the people.

But it was never any man who reformed the Church, it was the Holy Spirit who brought about the change. The Lord used honest men to do it, just as He can use honest and God-fearing men today, to do His will.

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The Most Dangerous Man in Tudor England. William Tyndale BBC Two

William Tyndale  © 2013 Simon Peter Sutherland

William Tyndale
© 2013 Simon Peter Sutherland

On Thursday 7th June at 9pm the BBC broadcast a new documentary on William Tyndale. This documentary was written and presented by Melvyn Bragg.

I was in Scotland that day and I was unsure if I was going to be able to catch the film. I am glad I did.

But such is not always the case.

These days when it comes to Christianised documentaries by the BBC, I often roll my eyes or become irritated by the constant errors and prejudice the documentaries manifest. So often the BBC presents far fetched and somewhat speculative scholarship and narrow minded claims against Christian Truths and Truth in general. But such was not the case with “The Most Dangerous man in Tudor England”. In fact, in my view this was better than ten years worth of BBC documentaries and BBC films rolled into one.

I enjoy researching the life and works of Tyndale and after a number of years research into his New Testament with many actual original prints of the Tyndale New Testament and his writings at Chethams Library and John Rylands Library, I can say Melvyn Bragg presented an honest, none-prejudice telling of the life of England’s greatest Biblical Scholar.

 

Tyndale New TestamentWilliam Tyndale wrote some outstanding Theological works and I think, his New Testament is the most outstanding English translation of the New Testament ever.

What I would say is that if any viewers or my readers are unaware of the life and teachings of William Tyndale and of his translation, then look him up, research him from his actual writings and of course his translation.

And to the BBC, please, in the spirit of accuracy, lets have a little less prejudice and more Truth.

May the God of William Tyndale, the Salvation of our Lord Jesus Christ and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with Melvyn Bragg and with you all. Amen

Recommended reads:

Tyndales New Testament. 1534 edition (modern spelling by David Daniell)
Works of William Tyndale. 2 Volumes
The Obedience of a Christian man by William Tyndale
William Tyndale. A Biography by David Daniell

Also you can find my William Tyndale Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Life-and-Teachings-of-William-Tyndale/192363984132613

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On reading old books and Bibles

Old Bible page, William TyndaleOld bibles truly bless me, they are so full of age and character and records of past lives. Many old Bibles contain much hand written history of times gone by, where people have lived and died, loved and lost and lives have been changed by the scriptures and their brief histories written down within the old pages.

Old books and history can help us reflect upon our own mortality, indeed it helps me and forever reminds me that one day all of us will die. Each of us will lose our earthly lives but for those who belong to Jesus, each of us will win a much better one. This is not morbid in my eyes, but a demonstration of true glory. For the true Christian who departs this life, will be within a life that has no end.

Thomas a Kempis, an early author who wrote one very old book named, ‘The Imitation of Christ’ said, “Very quickly there will be an end of thee here, look what will become of thee in another world. To-day a man is here; to-morrow he hath disappeared” (Book 1. Chapter 23) Such a touching verse, and one worthy of the memory. No one knows the hour when we will depart this life for our venture into the next, be it heaven or hell?

So next time you see an old book, or see a grave, remember that one day, you will be history, you will go the same way. And if you have ever seen a man die, remember that you must pass the same way. Therefore, think upon these things daily and remember yourself, that you may be remembered.

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William Tyndales “Congregation”

Tyndale New TestamentThou art Peter and upon this rock will I build my congregation” Matthew 16: 18. Coverdale Bible. 1537

Matthew 16: 18 as translated in most Bibles is an over literal reading. Willaim Tyndale in his 1526 New Testament used the word ‘Congregation‘ in translation of of the Greek “Ekklesia“.

It is this exact term which is likely that Myles Coverdale employed this word and translation from Tyndale. The Greek ‘ekklēsia‘ holds the meaning of ‘assembly‘ and it is likely that Tyndale translated this word correctly, even more so than many other translations.

This wording is not contained in many translations, but it is in the Tyndale NT, The Coverdale Bible and the Bishops Bible.

Even in such texts as Revelation 2: 9, where the Greek ‘sunagoge‘ is used, Tyndale employs the same word ‘Congregation‘. Which no doubt has many complications for the established ‘Church’. For, in Tyndales understanding, the congregation is the Church and her leadership and not the established order of the Clergy or Kings.

Is there any wonder why the established ‘state’ church burned his translation?

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Why a King James ‘only’ movement?

DSC02077The King James Bible is an absolutely beautiful translation. Its language and use of the Hebrew and Greek texts is one of a kind and stands out high above nearly all other translations. The translation is exquisite and graceful, poetic and ancient sounding, Christ magnifying and full of grandeur and splendor. It is a true translation and worthy to be called the word of God.

But aside from this, there is a movement which is strange and totally opposite to the text it claims to represent. The KJV only movement is embraced by many and is often agressive in attitude and forceful and totally rejective of other translations and even esteems the KJV text above the Hebrew and Greek texts. I believe this movement is a huge error. There are other old translations which are true and good also, the Tyndale New Testament, the Coverdale Bible, the Geneva Bible, and more. Should we reject them too?

It seems that something that could be beautiful and good has been clouded over greatly by a movement which has little actual clear reasoning or openness to other translations of scripture. So, it seems odd that many people today embrace the KJV only movement, and since there is not one verse in the entire cannon of scripture that claims that English people are to be subject ‘exclusively’ to a translation that would be set forth in 1611 in Olde English, the movement has little Biblical support.

King James BibleI can understand the worries that many have today regarding modern translations and the corruptness that can be found in many of them. But does that mean we are to cast away any goodness that can be found in other translations? I think not.

After all, the King James only movement is inconsistent with itself since the original 1611 King James Version (Authorised version) is not the same as those in the shops today. The original 1611 version had the apocrypha in it and did so until the 19th century when it was edited out by certain publishers.

So what then is the King James only movement if its followers do not read the actual original unedited Authorised Version?

If only we could just read the King James Bible without having this cloud of extreme KJV onlyism over our heads, then we could see the beauty of the KJV and enjoy its beauty.

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